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The Finding of Goose Cove…

Grey Goose III

Friday 13th May…

Dark Skies over Barton Broad

Dark Skies over Barton Broad

We’re running late.  The plan was to leave Waterland base camp long before sunset and find a wild mooring on the River Ant but, by as we get underway, the light was already fading and the low overcast clouds made it feel darker still.

Monty and Mabel

Grey Goose III makes her way across Barton Broad under darkening skies…

At the window...

Where are we, and what are you doing out there?

Our dogs, Monty (the Jack Russell) and Mabel (the Cocker Spaniel) wonder what’s going on as we head out into the fading light…

It’s well past 9pm as we make a dash across Barton Broad and we stop at the first mooring we find, which is right on the edge of the broad.

Saturday 14th May… 

River Ant at Barton Broad

A new day begins…  Grey Goose III moored at a wild mooring on the edge of Barton Broad

After a blustery but otherwise uneventful night at Barton, we make way to search for a wild mooring South of Irstead.  They are  called a “wild mooring”, rather than just a “mooring” when there’s really just a bit of riverbank people have stopped at, and the ground has got flattened by people’s feet, and perhaps they have lit a fire, but there is no wooden quay to moor next to, or posts to tie a boat to, and certainly no electric points to connect to. So they are literally places to moor out in the wilds.

To our surprise lots of the wild moorings are free, so we have our pick and choose a lovely looking spot near Reedham Hill.  A flock of Greylag Geese and their chicks  are resting in a small bay by the mooring.   It’s such a lovely spot and, in lieu of an official place name, I am going to call it…

Goose Cove…

Greylag Geese at Goose Cove

One of the families of Geese at the mooring…

Grey Goose III at Goose Cove

Monty and Mable seem to approve of this mooring…


After a little exploring, we agree this is a marvellous mooring.   Close to How Hill nature reserve, there is an overgrown track that follows the river to the North and links up with the other wild moorings further up.  Another footpath heads off to the East, past Cobbs Farm and Snipe Marsh on the way to Sharp Street, a picturesque Broadland Village.  Here we also find attractive lanes and a number of footpaths that traverse some beautiful Norfolk countryside.

A View of the  River…

River Ant at How Hill

An aerial view of the River Ant as it approaches How Hill

River Ant

The River Ant, looking North towards Barton Broad…

Sharp Street…

This small village consists of just a few houses and cottages nestled into some delightful Norfolk countryside.  Secluded lanes and footpaths provide an abundance of walks across arable farmland near to the nature reserve of How Hill.

Country Cottage

An Idyllic cottage overlooks Snipe Marsh

Dandelion Pollen

It’s easy to see how insects spread pollen: this visiting Bee is covered in it …

Footpath through the fields

Footpath through the fields

Country Lane

Tree lined Norfolk Lanes…


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